Category: Observing

Signs of Spring

Signs of Spring

Posted: April 17, 2017| Category: Observing

There are many signs of spring, besides the Spring Equinox in March, marking the official beginning to seeing a change in the seasons. From the first migrating bird arrivals such as the song sparrows and loggerhead shrikes, to the wild phlox that begins to bloom bringing on the pink full moon… Read More
Bohemian Waxwings in Winter

Bohemian Waxwings in Winter

Posted: March 2, 2017| Category: Observing

If you spot a flock of gleeful birds feasting on berries in your yard or neighborhood this winter, it is possible that you have come across a group of Bohemian waxwings. These sleek grayish birds are named for their nomadic nature, migrating in groups from their summer breeding grounds in… Read More
Winter Finches

Winter Finches

Posted: January 16, 2017| Category: Observing

Have you noticed fewer finches at your feeders this winter? We asked Director Emeritus of the Fairbanks Museum, Charlie Browne, who is a longtime Northeast Kingdom Audubon Officer about this observation. He says, “There seem to be no Pine Siskins, Purple Finches, or Redpolls to be found in our area… Read More
Christmas Bird Count 2017

Christmas Bird Count 2017

Posted: December 20, 2016| Category: Observing

Northeast Kingdom Audubon, a Chapter of the National Audubon Society, invites birdwatchers to participate in the longest-running citizen science survey, the annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC).  On January 1, 2017, birders and nature enthusiasts will fan out across parts of Barnet, Peacham, Danville, St. Johnsbury, Waterford, Monroe, and… Read More
An Ode to Starlings

An Ode to Starlings

Posted: November 18, 2016| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Learning, Observing

Most of the time invasive species become that way by accident. From ash borers to zebra mussels, a lot of critters stow away on ships and end up where they are really damaging. Some species are different, critters released for apparently practical purposes (population control of another invasive species, for… Read More
River Exploration

River Exploration

Posted: October 28, 2016| Categories: Learning, Observing

Outdoor Observations – At Water Andric, a stream just South of St. Johnsbury that feeds into the Passumpsic River, over 40 fourth graders from Lyndon Town School gathered on a pleasantly warm and sunny October morning. It was a field excursion led by Fairbanks Museum educators to encourage stream exploration and… Read More
Endangered Bees

Endangered Bees

Posted: October 14, 2016| Category: Observing

The Buzz about Bees. The US Fish and Wildlife Service has added seven species of yellow-faced bees to the endangered species list. This federal recognition of seven Hawaiian bee species as endangered may be just the tip of the iceberg. The announcement signals vulnerabilities, not just for bees, but also an… Read More
Meadow Expedition

Meadow Expedition

Posted: October 11, 2016| Categories: Learning, Observing

Cultivating Curiosity – Fifty first graders from the St. Johnsbury School stepped into a “Classroom without Walls” last month as Museum educators ventured to the Rankin’s Farm in nearby Danville. There, we focused on seed dispersal, seasonal changes, collecting specimens, and examining our discoveries under transportable microscopes! We practiced observing… Read More
Monarch Migration

Monarch Migration

Posted: September 30, 2016| Category: Observing

The monarch butterfly is not only the state butterfly of Vermont, but it is also an iconic symbol of summer. Monarchs are seasonal residents here, and are now embarking upon a continent-spanning journey to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Monarch butterflies are the only butterfly species known to migrate two… Read More
Bird’s Nest Fungus

Bird’s Nest Fungus

Posted: September 2, 2016| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Observing

September 2, 2016 – New on the Flower Table today, we’ve put out a variety of Bird’s Nest Fungus. Our sample, Cyanthus pygmaeus, was found growing in a garden bed in Peacham, Vermont. This tiny fungus is a wonder. As their name suggests, the fruiting body looks like a miniature… Read More