Category: Mark Breen

September Astronomy

September Astronomy

Posted: August 30, 2022| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy

Summer’s constellations, Scorpio and Sagittarius, begin their departure, progressing from south toward the southwest through the month.  At the same time, Saturn edges higher from southeast into the south, and Jupiter rises into the east, joined by Mars before midnight.  Extending up from the Teapot in Sagittarius, the broad, faint… Read More
Star Party

Star Party

Posted: July 22, 2022| Categories: Mark Breen, Museum News, Planetarium News, StarGazing

Friday, August 5, 9:00 PM You’re invited to a statewide star party with hosts Mark Breen, director of the planetarium at the Fairbanks Museum, and Vermont Public’s Mary Engisch. Mark produces the astronomy podcast Eye on… Read More
July Astronomy

July Astronomy

Posted: June 29, 2022| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy

The southern skies host the red star Antares marking the “heart” of the Scorpion, with claws stretching to the west, and its tail right along the horizon. To its left, crossing the “river of light” known as the Milky Way, is the “teapot” in Sagittarius. Climbing higher in the east,… Read More
July Weather

July Weather

Posted: June 29, 2022| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, Skywatch Almanac Weather, Weather

Summer is most at home in July, the month least likely to see frost or snow. Daylight lingers its longest, the evening sunset within a minute of two of its latest of the year. The days only shorten by a half hour, giving the Sun plenty of time to heat… Read More
June Weather

June Weather

Posted: May 30, 2022| Categories: Eye on the Sky, Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, Skywatch Almanac Weather

“Swallows fly high, clear blue sky. Swallows fly low, prepare for a blow.” Though it is a bit premature to say that summer is in full swing, June certainly has all the elements at its disposal. The longest daylight hours can push thermometers toward that elusive 100 degree mark in… Read More
May Weather

May Weather

Posted: May 1, 2022| Categories: Eye on the Sky, Mark Breen, Skywatch Almanac Weather, Weather

“Thunder in May fills the barn with hay” Visions of flowers and newly green hills bring out a smile as bright as the May sunshine. It marks the destination that makes all the earlier frustrations melt into the blue sky and long, lingering afternoons. However, the actual arrival of May… Read More
May Astronomy

May Astronomy

Posted: April 30, 2022| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy

May welcomes the return of some of summer’s brighter stars, including Vega in the northeast, and Antares in the southeast. High in the south, Leo the Lion prowls toward the southwest through the month, while high above, the Big Dipper guides you with its handle to “arc” to Arcturus, then… Read More
October Astronomy

October Astronomy

Posted: September 30, 2021| Categories: Mark Breen, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy

As the shorter days give way to longer nights, the Milky Way arches from near the Teapot of Sagittarius, hosting Jupiter and Saturn in the south-southwest, through the Summer Triangle high in the southwest, then into the northeast to greet the rising star Capella.  Summer’s bright star Arcturus sets in… Read More
October Weather

October Weather

Posted: September 29, 2021| Categories: Eye on the Sky, Mark Breen, Skywatch Almanac Weather, Weather

What a frenzied pace October has, rushing to complete some last warm, sunny days, yet moving right along to frosty mornings and perhaps the first fits of snow, often enough to dust the mountain tops while the brilliant foliage lingers below. It seems to mimic our own rush through this… Read More
September Astronomy

September Astronomy

Posted: August 28, 2021| Categories: Eye on the Sky, Mark Breen, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy, What's Happening

Summer’s constellations, Scorpio and Sagittarius, begin their departure, progressing from south toward the southwest through the month.  At the same time, the planetary duo of Jupiter and Saturn climb higher from the southeast into the south.  Extending up from the Teapot in Sagittarius, the broad, faint path of the Milky… Read More