February Astronomy

The Andromeda Galaxy, the most distant object visible without a telescope, appears as a tiny smudge of light in the February evening sky.

The Andromeda Galaxy, the most distant object visible without a telescope, appears as a tiny smudge of light in the February evening sky.

January 31, 2018| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, Planetarium News, Skywatch Almanac Astronomy

Orion commands the southern evening skies throughout February, accompanied by the brightest star in our night skies, Sirius, below and left of Orion, marking the nose of the Great Dog.  High in the south, Taurus, the Bull charges at Orion, as the Big Dipper begins to lift higher into the northeast.  The planets are mainly in the morning skies, with Jupiter rising after midnight, low in the south by dawn.  Mars is to the left, gradually shifting from Jupiter toward Saturn, low in the southeast.  Late in the month, Venus makes a teasing appearance, bright but low in the southwest.

Check Eye on the Night Sky for what’s happening today.

Our Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium offers daily planetarium shows with additional options during February vacation.

It is rare to have a month without a full moon, but this month is one of those rare occasions. January had two full moons (the second a “super blue blood moon”), and March will have two as well! February misses out, but this only happens once every 19 years!

Get daily updates from the Fairbanks Museum’s Eye on the Night Sky!

Winter is the best time to view the northern lights (Aurora borealis), which are occasionally visible from Vermont. This photo was taken in Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge in northern Maine (Mike Lewinski).

 

Join us at the Lyman Spitzer Jr. Planetarium at the Fairbanks Museum!

 

Tags: astronomy, Fairbanks Museum, Mark Breen, skywatch