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  Detailed Forecast   |     Recreational   |     The Weather Journal   |     Farm and Garden Journal
  Detailed Forecast

 

 

 

 

September 16, 2014

The forecast for all of Vermont, and adjoining New Hampshire, New York, Quebec, and Massachusetts:

Today:  Morning showers tapering off west to east.  Some partial clearing west to east in the afternoon, with a chance of a stray shower.  Highs in the low to mid 60s.  Winds shifting from southwest to northwest near 10 mph. 

Tonight:  Any evening clouds giving way to mostly clear skies.  Cool.  Areas of river valley fog.  Lows in the 40s, a few upper 30s in the cooler valleys.  Winds light and variable.

Wednesday:  Morning valley fog burning off.  Sunshine, mixing with clouds north and west in the afternoon.  Highs in the low to mid 60s.  Light winds, becoming south to southwest near 10 mph.

 

Extended Forecast:

Wednesday Night:  Mostly clear south.  Periods of clouds north, with a widely scattered shower possible far north.  Lows in the upper 30s to mid 40s.

Thursday:  Partly sunny, perhaps a stray mountain shower north.  Highs in the mid 50s to low 60s, some low 50s in the northern mountains.

Thursday Night:  Mostly clear and chilly.  Areas of frost and river valley fog.  Lows in the 30s, some upper 20s in the colder mountain valleys.

Friday:  Valley fog burning off.  Mostly sunny  Highs in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Friday Night:  Mostly clear.  Areas of river valley fog.  Lows in the 30s to low 40s.

Saturday:  Valley fog burning off.  Partly sunny and milder.  Highs in the 60s.

 

SIGNIFICANT/HAZARDOUS WEATHER:
None today.  Colder air arriving Thursday may produce frost Thursday night.



  Recreational  Return to top  

General Forecast:

Morning showers tapering off west to east.  Some partial clearing west to east in the afternoon, with a chance of a stray shower.  Highs in the low to mid 60s.  Winds shifting from southwest to northwest near 10 mph. 

 

Brief Discussion: 

The remnants of a cold front are bringing some showers to the region this morning.  A light southwest airflow and some clouds have held temperatures several degrees higher overnight.  The reason for the cold front’s demise – the air behind the front is getting a little warmer, because it is arriving from the west, rather than the north or northwest.  It means clearing and seasonably cool tonight as high pressure builds east from the Great Lakes.  That should set the stage for a pleasant day Wednesday.   Later in the day, more clouds will arrive in northern and western sections, the fore-runners of a cold front dropping south through central Canada. 

This next cold front will stall for the next 24 to 36 hours as two things happen – high pressure moves over us, and a storm in the Canadian Rockies heads east along the front.  This will keep most of the moisture to our north, allowing just a few scattered showers over far northern sections later Wednesday night, lingering over the northern mountains Thursday.  At that point, another surge of significantly colder air arrives, setting the stage for some scattered to widespread frost Thursday night, depending on the wind and cloud cover.  Fair, cool weather follows Friday, then turning milder for the upcoming weekend, though with a rising chance of showers, especially north.

 

Mountain Forecast:

The summits begin the morning in the clouds with showers, tapering off west to east, with the clouds beginning to lift and break in the Adirondacks in the afternoon.  Moderate west winds, and seasonably cool.  Clearing skies tonight, with lots of sunshine Wednesday, a few degrees milder, with mainly light west winds.  Thursday will see periods of clouds in the northern mountains, possibly a shower or even a wet snowflake, remaining partly to mostly sunny south.  Gusty north winds and turning colder.

 

WINDS...............Tuesday...........................Wednesday.....................Thursday

2000 FT........S>W 10 to 15 mph..........W>SW 5 to 10 mph.........NW 10 to 20 mph

4000 FT.....SW>NW 10 to 20 mph......W>SW 5 to 15 mph.........NW 20 to 30 mph

6000 FT.........W 20 to 35 mph................W 25 to 40 mph............W>N 30 to 45 mph

TEMPERATURES

2000 FT.............56 N/61 S..........................56 N/61 S............................40s

4000 FT.............upper 40s.............................low 50s..........................40s>30s

6000 FT.............upper 30s.............................low 40s..........................30s>20s

 

Winds at Lower Elevations:

Winds today will be light, mainly swinging from southwest to northwest near 10 mph, with waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain around 1 foot.  Winds becoming light and variable overnight, except south 5 to 15 mph on Lake Champlain, with waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain building to 1 to 2 feet.  On Wednesday, light winds, becoming south to southwest near 10 mph, with waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain near 1 foot.  Friday's outlook calls for northwest winds 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph.



  The Weather Journal  Return to top  

The sunrise this morning, September 16th, is at 6:30, and will set this evening at 7:00, the length of the day shortening at 12 hours and 30 minutes. 

A late-season heat-wave from the 15th to the 17th produced mid-summer heat across New England on this date in 1939.   East Barnet, VT was baked by afternoon temperatures of 96, St. Johnsbury topped out at 95, while Burlington’s record of 92 is also the latest it has reached 90 degrees there.  In spite of such late-season heat, the following winter was cold and snowy.


 

  Farm and Garden Journal  Return to top  

General Forecast:

Morning showers tapering off west to east.  Some partial clearing west to east in the afternoon, with a chance of a stray shower.  Highs in the low to mid 60s.  Winds shifting from southwest to northwest near 10 mph. 

 

Brief Discussion: 

The remnants of a cold front are bringing some showers to the region this morning.  A light southwest airflow and some clouds have held temperatures several degrees higher overnight.  The reason for the cold front’s demise – the air behind the front is getting a little warmer, because it is arriving from the west, rather than the north or northwest.  It means clearing and seasonably cool tonight as high pressure builds east from the Great Lakes.  That should set the stage for a pleasant day Wednesday.   Later in the day, more clouds will arrive in northern and western sections, the fore-runners of a cold front dropping south through central Canada. 

This next cold front will stall for the next 24 to 36 hours as two things happen – high pressure moves over us, and a storm in the Canadian Rockies heads east along the front.  This will keep most of the moisture to our north, allowing just a few scattered showers over far northern sections later Wednesday night, lingering over the northern mountains Thursday.  At that point, another surge of significantly colder air arrives, setting the stage for some scattered to widespread frost Thursday night, depending on the wind and cloud cover.  Fair, cool weather follows Friday, then turning milder for the upcoming weekend, though with a rising chance of showers, especially north.

 

 

Rainfall Amounts:    Showers tapering off this morning, possible a localized shower this afternoon.  Additional amounts less than 0.10 inches.  Dry weather then returns through the rest of the week in southern areas.  A few scattered showers, producing less than 0.10 inches, are possible Wednesday night into early Thursday for areas from the Adirondacks and Rt. 2 north into Quebec.  Dry Friday and Saturday.

Drying Conditions:    Fair drying conditions west of the Green Mountains, where showers will end by mid-morning, and fair to poor drying from the Green Mountains east, where morning showers will linger.  Minimum relative humidities near 50 percent west, and 60 percent east.  Fair to good drying conditions Wednesday and Thursday, with a few spotty showers far north Wednesday night into Thursday, and minimum relative humidities near 45 percent.   Good drying Friday and Saturday. 

Frost:   No frost expected tonight, though a few 30s are possible in the colder mountain valleys north.  Clouds will make it a little milder Wednesday night, then another clear and chilly night Thursday night, with frost possible.



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