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  Detailed Forecast

 

 

 

 

October 22, 2014

The forecast for all of Vermont, and adjoining New Hampshire, New York, Quebec, and Massachusetts:

***FLOOD WATCH FOR EASTERN NH, SOUTH OF THE WHITE MTNS***

Tonight: Cloudy with periods of rain, heaviest in New Hampshire. Areas of fog. Lows mainly in the mid 40s, some lower 40s in the Adirondacks. Winds north to northeast 10 to 15 mph.

Thursday: Cloudy. Patchy fog. Rain likely, heaviest in New Hampshire and in the southern Green Mountains. Highs in the upper 40s to lower 50s. Winds north 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph.

Thursday Night: Cloudy with areas of fog. Periods of rain north, becoming more showery in the south. Lows in the low to mid 40s. North to northwest winds around 10 mph.

 

Extended Forecast:

Friday: Mostly cloudy, with showers likely north and in the mountains, scattered in southern valleys. Highs from the mid 40s to around 50, some lower 50s in southern New Hampshire, and in the Hudson and St. Lawrence Valleys. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph.

Friday Night:  Mostly cloudy, with scattered showers decreasing.  Lows in the 40s.

Saturday:  Variable clouds and sun, more sun in the valleys, then increasing afternoon clouds, with a rising chance of showers west.  Highs in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

Saturday Night:  Mostly cloudy, with scattered showers, most numerous over the northern mountains.  Lows in the upper 30s to mid 40s.

Sunday:  Lots of clouds, a few breaks of sun, mainly south, and scattered showers, most likely in the north and mountains.  Highs in the upper 40s to mid 50s.

 

SIGNIFICANT/HAZARDOUS WEATHER:
An extended period of rain through Friday may lead to rising river levels, and will need to be monitored.



  Recreational  Return to top  

General Forecast:

***FLOOD WATCH FOR EASTERN NH, SOUTH OF THE WHITE MTNS*** 

Today:  Morning rain and showers, mainly across northern NH and VT, mostly dry elsewhere, then periods of rain spreading from NH, west into VT and the Berkshires in the afternoon, and a rising chance of rain in NY.  Chilly and raw.  Highs only in the mid 40s to low 50s.  Winds north to northeast 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph.   

 

Brief Discussion: 

Rain and showers, damp, raw weather is certainly the theme through the rest of the week.  However, it will not be a continuous, hour-after-hour deluge of rain, but rather episodes of rain, intervals of drier weather between, with a tendency for the least rain through northern NY and the St. Lawrence Valley, while heavier rain soaks portions of NH.

Low pressure has re-developed to the east of New Jersey this morning, and is strengthening, leading to a few thunderstorms along the New Jersey and Long Island shores, including New York City, indicators of the increasing energy involved with the storm.  High pressure has also strengthened to our north through central Quebec.  This helps to enhance the easterly airflow generated by the storm’s counter-clockwise circulation.  It draws ample amounts of moisture in from the ocean, while at the surface, the winds become more northeast and north.

One patch of moisture has been riding northwest from Maine, and will mainly bring showers to northern parts of NH and VT this morning, before diminishing later this morning.   Much of the rest of the region will stay dry other than a random shower.  Then a steadier, soggy collection of rain spreads from Maine west through NH, then VT and the Berkshires, and finally into NY this afternoon.  That, too, may diminish for a while tonight, only to be replaced by additional episodes of rain tomorrow.

The storm will gradually pull northeast Friday with decreasing showers, and perhaps a brief period of clearing Friday night and Saturday morning, before another system slides in with scattered showers later Saturday, diminishing Sunday.  Finally, drier and milder weather makes a return early next week.

 

Mountain Forecast:

The summits will be in the clouds, along with periods of rain, briefly mixed with sleet or freezing rain this morning above 5000 feet, continuing through Friday morning.  Moderate northeast wind, strong across the Presidential Range in NH.  Little temperature change, though slightly milder Thursday.   Friday's outlook is for lingering rain and showers, slightly cooler temperatures, and lighter winds.

 

WINDS............Wednesday....................Thursday...........................Friday

2000 FT........NE 20 to 30 mph.........NE 20 to 30 mph.........NE>NW 10 to 20 mph

4000 FT.........E 25 to 35 mph............E 25 to 35 mph................N 10 to 20 mph

6000 FT.........E 35 to 50 mph............E 35 to 45 mph.............NE>N 15 to 25 mph

TEMPERATURES

2000 FT.................40s...............................40s..................................40s

4000 FT.............low 40s.......................upper 40s.............................40s

6000 FT............upper30s...........................40s...............................near 40

 

Winds at Lower Elevations:

Winds today will continue from the north to northeast, 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph, with waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain 1 to 2 feet.    Winds overnight from the north to northeast 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 20 mph, with waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain 1 to 2 feet.  North winds on Thursday 10 to 15 mph, gusting to 25 mph, as waves on the open waters of Lake Champlain remain at 1 to 2 feet.  Friday's outlook calls for north to northwest winds near 10 mph.



  The Weather Journal  Return to top  

October 22nd finds the sun rising at 7:14, setting at 5:55, as the day shortens to 10 hours and 41 minutes. 

The last part of October is not a stranger to the first true snow storms of the year.  They rarely stay just yet, but they make quite an impression.  Over 40 years ago, on this date in 1969, winter started early with a general snowfall from the valley floors to the mountain tops.  An inch or two was noted in most valleys, except 5 inches in Burlington where a north wind kept the Champlain Valley cold.  The mountains above 3000 feet were whitened with 10 to 20 inches, including 25 inches on Mt. Washington.



  Farm and Garden Journal  Return to top  

General Forecast:

The Farm and Garden Journal ended for this year as of October 15th.

It will resume in April of 2015. 




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