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  Detailed Forecast

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Click HERE for a map of the Eye On The Sky Forecast Regions 

April 24, 2014

The forecast for all of Vermont, and adjoining New Hampshire, New York, Quebec, and Massachusetts:

Tonight: Becoming mainly clear. Lows in the 20s; near 30 far south and in the Champlain Valley. Winds northwest 10 to 15 mph and gusting to 25 mph early, then diminishing to light and variable.

Friday: A mix of clouds and sun early, then clouds increasing from the west, reaching the Green Mountains by mid-afternoon. Highs in the upper 50s to lower 60s north, low to mid 60s south. Light and variable winds, becoming southeast less than 10 mph west of the Greens.

Friday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a rising chance of showers. Lows from the mid 30s to low 40s. Southeast winds 5 to 10 mph.

Extended Forecast:

Friday Night:  Mostly cloudy, with a rising chance of showers.  Lows in the mid 30s to low 40s.

Saturday:  Rain or showers likely, tapering off west, with breaks of afternoon sun southwest.  Highs in the mid 50s to low 60s.

Saturday Night:  Mostly cloudy, with a chance of showers, possibly snow showers in the northern mountains.  Lows in the 30s.

Sunday:  Mostly cloudy north with a chance of showers.  Partly sunny south, maybe a shower.  Highs in the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Sunday Night:  Partly cloudy.  Lows in the upper 20s to mid 30s.

Monday:  Partly sunny.  Highs in the 50s.

 

SIGNIFICANT/HAZARDOUS WEATHER:
Water levels remain above flood stage on Lake Champlain.  Red Flag Warning for southern and central VT, the Berkshires, west to eastern NY, for high fire danger, with low humidity and strong winds.  Fire danger is high throughout the region.



  Recreational  Return to top  

General Forecast:

This Afternoon:   Mostly sunny, except sun mixed with clouds and sun in the northern Green Mountains east to northern NH and into the Eastern Townships.  Blustery and cool.  Highs in the upper 40s to mid 50s.  Winds northwest 10 to 20 mph, gusting to 40 mph.             

Brief Discussion: 

We’ve seen lots of sunshine through midday, but windy and rather cool for late April.  The exception has been a fair number of clouds through northern VT into northern NH and the Eastern Townships.   Even a few flurries were noted this morning, though nearly all of that activity has diminished.  The wind, as well as the sun and the clouds are the western edges of a strong storm just southeast of Nova Scotia.  The storm will be slow to move east today, finally doing so tonight.  With lots of sun, lots of wind, and very dry air riding those winds south from high pressure stretched from northern Canada south through western NY into the Carolinas, fire danger is very high.  It seems counter-intuitive that spring, with its melting snow and damp ground, is the time of year when grass, brush, and forest fires are at their peak.   But the dead vegetation, as well a debris from winter winds and storms, represent lots of fuel that can easily get dried out with the strong spring sun.  In fact, I heard a farm years ago tell me that spring was that driest time of the year.  That seemed a bit odd.  But the air we have here now came from northern Canada, where it is still below zero at times.  When you heat that air up, it is like heating your home in the winter.  There is very little moisture in it – so we use things like pans of water on the wood stove, and humidifiers to increase the moisture.

So the situation is that we have lots of fuel for fires, and winds that could quickly whip any fire out of control – please change any plans for outdoor burning until it rains, and be sure to check with you local fire wardens.

Tonight, that narrow wedge of high pressure, extending from Canada to the Carolinas will slide over us, helping the winds to drop off, and leave us with great viewing conditions for the waning Crescent Moon and the brilliant planet Venus, low in the east-southeast near 5:00 AM EDT.  There is an image of what you will see on our Eye on the Sky Facebook page.

With skies clearing, and high pressure briefly cresting over the region, winds will finally drop off, and so will the thermometers, sinking into the 20s, perhaps a few cold spots near 20. 

The clearing will be brief, as clouds increase from west to east tomorrow as a storm moves from the Plains into the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley tomorrow.  Ahead of it, milder temperatures and much lighter winds will be welcomed tomorrow.  However, the storm will deliver a showery, cool day Saturday.  The showers should be moving along, permitting the showers to diminish in the afternoon, and perhaps even a little clearing in southwest VT and the Berkshires late on Saturday.  The storm will be to our east Sunday, which means lots of clouds and a few brief showers north, while it becomes partly sunny in the south.

Any fair weather looks like it will be brief.  Some clearing Sunday night and Monday, but clouds and showers will be increasing later Tuesday into Wednesday, possibly lingering through the rest of next week.  Temperatures will continue to run on the cool side, keeping Spring’s arrival on the slow side.


 

Mountain Forecast:

Mainly sunny today, except clouds and a few snow showers northeast, obscuring the White Mountains above 3500 feet, lifting this afternoon.  Strong winds and cold.  Sun giving way to increasing clouds Friday, less wind, and milder.  Clouds lowering onto the summits Friday night into Saturday, with showers likely.

WINDS.............Thursday............................Friday..........................Saturday

2000 FT.......NW 20 to 30 mph..........NW>SW 5 to 10 mph.......SE 15 to 25 mph

4000 FT.....NNW 40 to 50 mph.........NW>SW 5 to 15 mph.........S 30 > 15 mph

6000 FT.....NNW 65 to 85 mph..........NW 50>SW 30 mph........S 30>W 25 mph

TEMPERATURES

2000 FT............42 N/51 S.........................52 N/59 S..........................40s

4000 FT................30s....................................40s................................30s

6000 FT................20s....................................30s................................30s

 

Winds at Lower Elevations:

Winds today northwest 10 to 20 mph, gusting to 40 mph.  Winds tonight from the northwest 10 to 15 mph, with gusts to 25 mph this evening, diminishing to light and variable overnight.  On Friday, light winds, becoming southeast less than 10 mph from the Green Mountains west.  South winds expected Saturday 10 to 15 mph.



  The Weather Journal  Return to top  

Sunrise on this 24th of April was at 5:53, and will set this evening at 7:45, 13 hours and 52 minutes later.  April of 1852 was a stormy, cold month. 

After 33 inches of snow during the month in Hanover, NH, a mild, thawing rain sent the rivers into high flood, including the "greatest flood ever known" up to that time in Wells River, VT.  Rain and melted snow for the month added up to 4.87 inches in Hanover, NH according to David Ludlum's Vermont Weather Book.



  Farm and Garden Journal  Return to top  

General Forecast:

General Forecast: 

This Afternoon:   Mostly sunny, except sun mixed with clouds and sun in the northern Green Mountains east to northern NH and into the Eastern Townships.  Blustery and cool.  Highs in the upper 40s to mid 50s.  Winds northwest 10 to 20 mph, gusting to 40 mph.             

Brief Discussion:  

Lots of sunshine today, but windy and rather cool for late April.  The exception will be a fair amount of clouds in the Northeast Kingdom, northern NH and the Eastern Townships, where a leftover sprinkle of snow or rain is possible, especially at higher elevations this morning.  The wind, as well as the sun and the clouds are the western edges of a strong storm just southeast of Nova Scotia.  The storm will be slow to move east today, finally doing so tonight.  At that point, a narrow wedge of high pressure, extending from northern Canada south through western NY into the Carolinas will slide over us, helping the winds to drop off, and leave us with great viewing conditions for the waning Crescent Moon and the brilliant planet Venus, low in the east-southeast near 5:00 AM EDT.  There is an image of what you will see on our Eye on the Sky Facebook page.

The clearing will be brief, as clouds increase from west to east tomorrow as a storm moves from the Plains into the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley tomorrow.  Ahead of it, milder temperatures and much lighter winds will be welcomed tomorrow.  However, the storm will deliver a showery, cool day Saturday.  The showers should be moving along, permitting the showers to diminish in the afternoon, and perhaps even a little clearing in southwest VT and the Berkshires late on Saturday.  The storm will be to our east Sunday, which means lots of clouds and a few brief showers north, while it becomes partly sunny in the south.

Any fair weather looks like it will be brief.  Some clearing Sunday night and Monday, but clouds and showers will be increasing later Tuesday into Wednesday, possibly lingering through the rest of next week.  Temperatures will continue to run on the cool side, keeping Spring’s arrival on the slow side.

 

Rainfall Amounts:  A few spotty snow or rain showers far northeast today, only covering 20 percent of the area, with less than 0.10 inches, otherwise dry through tomorrow evening.  Showers increasing Friday night, likely Saturday, tapering off Saturday night, retreating to the north and mountains Sunday.  Amounts of 0.25 to 0.75 possible, more south than north.

Drying Conditions:   Good to excellent drying today, minimum relative humidities dropping to 25 percent, except fair northeast with spotty showers, lots of clouds, and minimum relative humidities near 45 percent.  Good to excellent drying Friday, with minimum relative humidities near 30 percent.   Poor drying Saturday with showers, and fair to poor Sunday with leftover showers in the north and mountains.

Frost:  Frost or sub-freezing temperatures are likely tonight into Friday morning.  Temperatures remaining above freezing Saturday and Sunday, then near-freezing temperatures possible early next week.



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