Observation Bee Hive Arrives!

Observation Bee Hive Arrives!

| Categories: Fairbanks Museum, What's Happening

Can you spot her? The large female in the middle of this honeycomb, with the swollen, black abdomen? That’s the queen of our brand new Observation Bee Hive!

We are very excited to introduce this natural wonder to the town of St. Johnsbury and greater Northeast Kingdom region. Attached to the end of the ramp at the East Entrance, situated next to our prairie rose beds, our honey bees have now been introduced to their new home for the first time ever here at the Fairbanks Museum.

Featured here, a Balch Nature Preschool student gets a sneak peek and first-hand account of what it’s like setting up a bee hive. It’s important when relocating a nest that the new nest be several miles away from the previous location, so the bees don’t become confused and try to return to their original location.

We are grateful for the guidance of Mike Heath, of Peacham, who helped Adam Kane, director of the Museum, with this installation from start to finish. Although the bees and queen were taking up lodgings within Adam’s kitchen pantry, the weather is now just warming up enough to allow these sensitive six-legged insects to survive the more harsh, outside elements and weather. We are incredibly thankful to have George Cobb involved in this process, who helped convert this vintage wooden cabinet into the exhibit!

 

We’d like to encourage everyone to visit the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium to view this fascinating and incredible live bee exhibit. The Museum educators look forward to including this bee hive into their classes and summer programming, but of course, this is just the beginning. We’re still working on setting up the foundation of our upcoming Shippee Family Eyecare Butterfly Tent and are eagerly awaiting the arrival of our living insectarium!

Be sure to visit us this summer to experience and explore the wonderful, tiny world of insects!

 

Tags: Bees, Education, endangered, exploration, Fairbanks Museum, honey bees, insects, Natural History, Northeast Kingdom, observation, St. Johnsbury, vermont